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Paul Tudor Jones and Tudor Investment

Financial World
The Wall Street 100
By Stephen Taub, David Carey, Richard Coletti, Tom Bancroft
July 11, 1989
Page 38


Source: Financial World, July 11, 1989
Photograph by Alex Quesada/Matrix


Source: Financial World, July 11, 1989
Photograph by Alex Quesada/Matrix

No. 19 PAUL TUDOR JONES II
At least $30 million

Last year's top FW man on Wall Street, Jones saw his take at Tudor Investment fall by nearly two-thirds in a tough year in the pits. Although not a target, he did come under heavy questioning by CFTC authorities for his association with Mark Fisher, principal of MBF Clearing and a Wall Street 100 also-ran. Still Jones, 34, had returns ranging from 18% to 31% on $310 million in managed funds.

Financial World
The Wall Street 100
By Stephen Taub, David Carey, Amy Barrett, Richard J. Coletti and Jackie Gold
July 10, 1990
Page 56

No. 6 PAUL TUDOR JONES II
More than $65 million

Two years ago, this futures trader topped the Wall Street 100 list. This year he has to settle for sixth place, despite a 42.8% return. Jones wound up the year with $385 million in assets—even after he had paid back to investors the $200 million he produced for them last year. A former welterweight boxing champion at the University of Virginia, where he earned a BA in economics, Memphis-native Jones became E.F. Huttons youngest VP (25) in 1980. Contributes to "I Have a Dream" program and started a charity called Robin Hood to provide shelter and food to the homeless and needy. Uses a stretch limo to get home to his wife, a model. On weekends, he repairs to a 20-room home on the Chesapeake in Maryland. Recently, Jones pleaded guilty to charges of illegally filling protected wetlands on his estate and fired the project manager who was allegedly responsible for the violations. He has agreed to pay a $2 million settlement and faces a maximum jail sentence of six months.

Financial World
The Wall Street 100
By Stephen Taub and David Carey with Alison M. Smith
July 21, 1992
Page 40

No. 3 PAUL TUDOR JONES II
Tudor Investment
At least $60 million

last year's treacherous currency and interest-rate markets caught this 37-year-old New York futures kingpin off guard. Jones's funds posted a subpar 18% net return. Still, so richly bankrolled is Jones, whose clients' funds top $650 million and who trades some $200 million of his own, that even in lean times he makes a bundle. A University of Virginia alumnus and former Cotton Exchange floor trader, the once freewheeling bachelor has mellowed considerably since he wed an Australian fashion model in 1988. Jones recently formed a $125 million commodities pool with retired LBO ace Ray Chambers, called the One to One Charitable Fund, that will devote most of its profits to helping disadvantaged children.

Financial World
The Wall Street 100
By Stephen Taub, Nanette Byrnes, and David Carey
July 6, 1993
Page 41

No. 7 PAUL TUDOR JONES II
Tudor Investment
At least $85 million

The bizarre five-year-old saga involving Paul Tudor Jones and Bill Ellen, the environmental engineer Jones hired to transform part of a wetlands on Joness Maryland estate into a hunting and conservation preserve, has wound to a conclusion. Ellen is headed for jail because his handiwork allegedly violated the Clean Water Act. Jones had already pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor and reportedly paid a $2 million fine. That's a pittance, of course, for this New York City futures and currencies kingpin.

Last fall Jones, 38, made a killing playing European interest rate futures and currencies, salvaging a 25% after-fee return for what to that point had been a lackluster year. A rarity among futures traders, Jones—who manages $1.5 billion of pooled assets—largely shuns computer-driven technical trading models in favor of a fundamental approach, trusting his insights into the strengths and weaknesses of a host of securities and commodities markets.

A native of Memphis, Tenn., who once toiled in the rough-and-tumble New York Cotton Exchange pits, Jones gives to numerous charities—most notably the Robin Hood Foundation, which he co-founded in 1988 with Rolling Stone publisher Jann Wenner and which provides legal and management help for programs serving poor New Yorkers. A generous underwriter, probably Jones, pays all the foundations administrative expenses to make sure that every dollar raised goes directly to these programs.

Financial World
The Wall Street 100
Compensation was way down in 1994 for Wall Streets highest earners
By Stephen Taub, David Carey, and Joseph Epstein
July 4, 1995
Page 43

No. 6 PAUL TUDOR JONES II
Tudor Investment
At least $45 million

Hes b-a-a-a-ck! The Streets onetime whiz kid fell off the Wall Street 100 last year after earning a skimpy 1.5% return in hedge-fund-friendly 1993. But in 1994, Jones, who chairs the New York Cotton Exchange, was up 9%, net of fees in a very depressed year generally for the commodity and hedge fund folks. Even so, things have been so tough for large funds lately that Joness assets under management had dropped $700 million, to $1 billion, at the beginning of this year. Meanwhile, Jones will have to make do without Peter Borish, his partner and longtime associate. Borish plans to run a new firm that will rely on a computer trading system that Borish helped develop. Jones, on the other hand, avoids automated trading models, preferring to trade the "old-fashioned way," trusting his insights, brains and guts. The 40-year-old Memphis native is still very much involved with his Robin Hood Foundation, which he founded with Rolling Stone publisher Jann Wenner in 1988. In 1993 they raised approximately $1.5 million for underprivileged children at an event that featured a performance by Aretha Franklin and a special cameo appearance by New York Knicks coach Pat Riley. In 1994 they raised another $1.5 million at a performance by Tom Jones, also attended by Riley. This years performer: Earth Wind & Fire. Notable members of the board of directors include John F. Kennedy Jr., Marion Wright Edelman, founder of the Childrens Defense Fund, and Stanley Druckenmiller of Soros and Wall Street 100 fame. Additionally, Jones donated $500,000 to keep part of the Florida Everglades out of the clutches of sugarcane farmers

Financial World
The Wall Street 100
By David Carey and Stephen Taub
October 21, 1996
Page 59

No. 11 PAUL TUDOR JONES II
Tudor Investment
At least $60 million



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